Last edited by Fenrizilkree
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

1 edition of Dictionary of the Chinook jargon, or Indian trade language of the North Pacific coast. found in the catalog.

Dictionary of the Chinook jargon, or Indian trade language of the North Pacific coast.

Dictionary of the Chinook jargon, or Indian trade language of the North Pacific coast.

  • 290 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Shorey Book Store in Seattle .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Chinook jargon

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPM848 D55 1971
    The Physical Object
    Pagination42p.
    Number of Pages42
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20040072M

    Chinook Jargon is a pidgin comprised largely of words from the Nootka, (true, or pure) Chinook, French, and English languages. The Jargon was born in pre-European-contact times, and was used from north of Vancouver Island in northern B.C. southward to the northern California coast, and inland for some hundreds of miles.   Chinuk Wawa (also known as Jargon and Chinook Jargon) is a hybrid lingua franca consisting of simplified Chinookan, combined with contributions from Nuuchahnulth (Nootkan), Canadian French, English, and other languages. It originated on the lower Columbia River, where it once was the predominant medium of intertribal and interethnic s:

    Halkomelem (includes Musqueam) Dictionary of upriver Halkomelem / Brent D. Galloway (); Musqueam reference grammar / Wayne Suttles ( online, also print); Dialect survey of Halkomelem Salish / D. B. Gerdts ( online); Introduction to Hul'q'umi'num' (University of Victory language instruction website with audio lessons) Hunq̓umỉn̉um ̉: Musqueam language / by Arnold Guerin and . To communicate, a language based on a native trade jargon was utilized and eventually incorporated words from many of these cultures. "Chinook wawa" became the lingua franca of Fort Vancouver and.

    The trade winds or easterlies are the permanent east-to-west prevailing winds that flow in the Earth's equatorial region (between 30°N and 30°S latitudes). The trade winds blow predominantly from the northeast in the Northern Hemisphere and from the southeast in the Southern Hemisphere, strengthening during the winter and when the Arctic oscillation is in its warm phase. from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition. noun A moist warm wind blowing from the sea in coastal regions of the Pacific Northwest.; noun A warm dry wind that descends from the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains, causing a rapid rise in temperature.; noun A Chinook salmon.; from The Century Dictionary. noun A jargon of Indian, French, and English used as a.


Share this book
You might also like
Suzanne

Suzanne

The last manly man

The last manly man

Managing centralised acquisition procedures in institutions of higher education

Managing centralised acquisition procedures in institutions of higher education

graveyard monuments in Enderby parish churchyard

graveyard monuments in Enderby parish churchyard

Riceyman steps

Riceyman steps

The South Asia story

The South Asia story

Sheffield school of medicine ....

Sheffield school of medicine ....

Mathematics in Action--Critical Thinking--Grade 3

Mathematics in Action--Critical Thinking--Grade 3

Stable maps of foliations in manifolds

Stable maps of foliations in manifolds

Agricultural conservation program

Agricultural conservation program

Building trustworthy semantic webs

Building trustworthy semantic webs

The third part of the works of Mr. Abraham Cowley

The third part of the works of Mr. Abraham Cowley

Hal McIntyre and his orchestra.

Hal McIntyre and his orchestra.

Three letters to the editor of the Guardian

Three letters to the editor of the Guardian

The future of natural fibres

The future of natural fibres

Dictionary of the Chinook jargon, or Indian trade language of the North Pacific coast Download PDF EPUB FB2

DICTIONARY OF THE CHINOOK JARGON, OR INDIAN TRADE LANGUAGE, OF THE NORTH PACIFIC COAST. VICTORIA, B. HIBBEN CO., Publishers. Government Street, Entered according to Act of Parliament of Canada, in the yearby.

Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon, or Indian Trade Language, of the North Pacific Coast Language: English: LoC Class: PM: Language and Literatures: Indigenous American and Artificial Languages: Subject: Chinook jargon -- Glossaries, vocabularies, etc. Subject: Indians of North America -- Northwest Coast of North America -- Languages Category.

Chinook Jargon synonyms, Chinook Jargon pronunciation, Chinook Jargon translation, English dictionary definition of Chinook Jargon. A pidgin language combining words from Nootka, Chinook, Salishan languages, French, and English, formerly used as a lingua franca in the Pacific.

This is an extract from George Gibb’s Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon, or, Trade Language of Oregon. It includes part of his original introduction and the full text of the English-Chinook section of his dictionary.

The complete dictionary is available online through Project Gutenberg, acquirement of the original Indian languages; so much. An extinct pidgin composed of elements from Chinook, Nootka, English, French, and other languages, formerly used in the Pacific North-West of North America.

‘Jargons are used for communicating in limited situations: trade jargons generally, and Chinook Jargon, a trade language spoken along the north-west Pacific coast of North America from. Chinook Jargon (Chinuk Wawa or Chinook Wawa, also known simply as Chinook or Jargon) is a nearly extinct American indigenous language originating as a pidgin trade language in the Pacific Northwest, and spreading during the 19th century from the lower Columbia River, first to other areas in modern Oregon and Washington, then British Columbia and parts of Alaska, Northern California.

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon, or, Trade Language of Oregon, by George Gibbs Published ; Gutenberg release Date: Ap [EBook #] Language: English and Chinook Character set encoding: ISO Produced by David Starner, Richard Prairie and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.

An extinct pidgin composed of elements from Chinook, Nootka, English, French, and other languages, formerly used in the Pacific Northwest of North America. ‘Jargons are used for communicating in limited situations: trade jargons generally, and Chinook Jargon, a trade language spoken along the north-west Pacific coast of North America from the.

Chinook Jargon, also called Tsinuk Wawa, pidgin, presently extinct, formerly used as a trade language in the Pacific Northwest region of North is thought to have originated among the Northwest Coast Indians, especially the Chinook and the Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka) peoples.

The peoples of the Northwest Coast traded extensively among themselves and with communities in the interior. Chinook Wawa synonyms, Chinook Wawa pronunciation, Chinook Wawa translation, English dictionary definition of Chinook Wawa. A pidgin language combining words from Nootka, Chinook, Salishan languages, French, and English, formerly used as a lingua franca in the Pacific.

On cover: Dictionary of Chinook jargon, Indian trade language of the Pacific Coast. Contains advertising. Description: 35 pages ; 22 cm: Contents: pt. Chinook-English --pt.

English-Chinook --The Lord's Prayer in jargon. Other Titles: Dictionary of Chinook jargon, Indian trade language of the Pacific Coast. Book from Project Gutenberg: Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon or Indian Trade Language of the North Pacific Coast Skip to main content This banner text can have markup.

They were well known to the traders on the Pacific coast in the late 18th cent., and a corrupted form of their language known as Chinook jargon served as a trade language from the Columbia River to Alaska. There were some Chinook in the United States in. Chinook Jargon originated as a pidgin trade language of the Pacific Northwest, and spread quickly up the West Coast from modern Oregon to the regions now Washington, British Columbia, and is related to, but not the same as, the aboriginal language of the Chinook people, upon which much of its vocabulary is based.

Chinook Jargon, pidgin, presently extinct, formerly used as a trade language in the Pacific Northwest region of North America. It is thought to have originated among the Northwest Coast Indians, especially the Chinook and the Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka) peoples. The peoples of the Northwest Coast traded extensively among.

Chinook Illahee - the Chinook-speaking region, or the land of the Chinook people (the lower Columbia) Help - help No, Wake, Halo - the three words used in Chinook for no, not, nothing, or for the negative Wake and halo are pronounced wah-kay and hah-lo.

The Chinook Jargon and how to Use it: A Complete and Exhaustive Lexicon of the Oldest Trade Language of the American Continent. George Coombs Shaw. Rainier Printing Company, Incorporated, - Chinook jargon - 65 pages. the other on the Pacific coast to the south of Cape Flattery, which were occupied by Chimakuan tribes.

An important role in the development and spread of Chinook Jargon during this period was played by the Métis offspring of local Indian women and fur-company employees.

One legacy of those families is the approximately 15 percent of the Chinook Jargon lexicon derived from French, the predominant language of the fur-company rank-and-file. 15 percent of the Chinook Jargon lexicon derived from French, the predominant language of the fur-company its heyday in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Chinook Jargon was spoken throughout the Pacific Northwest, from northern California to the.

English-Chinook. PM T32 - Chinook jargon as spoken by the Indians of the Pacific coast. For the use of missionaries, traders, tourists and others who have business intercourse with the Indians. Chinook-English. English-Chinook. PM D55 B - Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon or Indian trade language of the North pacific coast.

1 In the past, Chinuk Wawa was frequently referred to as Chinook Jargon. The tribes that still speak and teach it refer to is as Chinuk Wawa. This lesson is going to use the modern nomenclature; historical documents may refer to the language as Chinook Jargon.

Overview The Indigenous languages of many Native Ameri.Get this from a library! Dictionary of the Chinook jargon: Indian trade language of the North Pacific coast.Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon (Victoria, BC: T.N. Hibben, late s) (multiple formats at ) Pocket Dictionary of the Chinook Jargon: the Indian Trading Language of Alaska, the Northwest Territory and the Northern Pacific Coast (San Francisco: Downing & Clark, ) (multiple formats at ).